Understanding Today's Narcissist
Understanding Today's Narcissist

Episode 18 · 2 years ago

Who is the Most Narcissistic Generation?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Millennials are known as the most narcissistic generation of our time. The overindulge attention, special treatment for nothing special, and excessive emotional tolerance that parents gave their kids have not resulted in a more productive generation but rather one that seems apathetic. It’s a toss-up between who is more confused: Millennials because the world does not work the way they envision it should or other generations because they don’t understand how Millennials think.

How did this happen? Some research has suggested that the lack of severe economic downturn during the childhood of millennials is to blame. Other hypothesis points the finger at parents who reinforced the idea that their child was so special that they didn’t have to adhere to the standards of society. While others believe society is responsible because every child received an award even when they came in the last place.

Whatever the cause, the traits of narcissism seem to apply to this generation (generally speaking). Yet despite the similarities, Millennials are not the typical grandiose or covert narcissists. Rather, the traits of narcissism, not the disorder itself seems to be more characteristic.

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...to grow with Christine Dot com forward slash narcissism. That's grow with Christine dot com, forward slash narcissism. This master class will change your life again. That's grow with Christine Dot Com. Forward Slash Narcissism. This is understanding today's narcissist, brought to you in part by Psych Centralcom and now here's your host, Christine Hammond. Today we're going to talk about who is the most narcissistic generation. Well, that could be up for debate now. Back in the day, like baby boomers were touted as being fairly narcissistic, and then my...

...generation, the generation of nothing, which was known as generation X, was also tauted as being fairly narcissistic, and Dir millennials. So now millennials are getting a bad rap. It's just their due turn, and it just comes and goes, every generation before you thinking that the one below you is not good enough or not as good as the previous generation. It's ironic that even Benjamin Franklin to out of that back in his day, and if we look at all the generations that came after him, surely there were definitely some good ones that were thrown in there. But let's talk about millennials, because they're kind of known right now is being fairly narcissistic. Yet how did this happen? Well, there was a an over indulgence of attention. There was a lot of special treatment for nothing and an excessive emotional tolerance that parents gave their kids, and instead of it resulting in a more productive generation, which is...

...what they were hoping for, it resulted in a more apathetic one. So it's a toss up as to WHO's more confused about this process. Is it millennials, because the world doesn't work the way that they envisioned it should or was told that it should? Or other generations because they just don't understand how millennials think? How in the world of this happen? Well, some research has suggested that the lack of severe economic downturn during childhood is to blame. Another hypothesis points fingers at parents who reinforce the idea that their child was so special that they didn't have to adhere to the standards of society, school rules, whatever it was. And yet others still believe that society is responsible, because every child received an award, even when they came in last place. So, whatever the cause of this, the traits of narcissism seem to apply...

...to this generation. Of course, we're speaking in very general terms here. Yet despite the similarities millennials are not your typical grandiose or covert and our assists. So they're not the two main types that we actually talk about. Rather, they seem to have just traits of narcissism without the full blown disorder of narcissism. So it is important to note that not every millennial has these narcissistic traits. The purpose of this article is to highlight how the traits of narcissism manifest within the generation and not to blanketly diagnose all of them as such. So here are the symptoms of Narcissism, rewritten as millennial traits. The first one a grandiose sense of self importance. member. That's the trait of a narcissist. This is what it looks like for the millllennial generation. So this...

...sometimes can manifest an attitude that millennials don't have to work hard to prove themselves, such as working at low paying jobs before expecting to rise to the top. Instead, they believe that they can achieve anything without having accomplished even a basic hurdle, and the result is that they don't even try. Sometimes, next trait fantasies of unlimited success. This may be a consequence of substituting video game fantasy, social media status or media idolatry for harsh reality and the gaining and media world. There are unlimited possibilities of achievement, but real life takes into account talent, determination, motivation, persistence, environment and timing. millennials sometimes prefer the fantasy over reality. So that's how fantasies of unlimited success manifest...

...with millennials. The next is believes that they are special. It's not unusual for a millennial to toe their non judgmental attitude as evidence of how they are set apart from other generations, particularly mine and therefore our special ironically, by stating that other generations are judgmental, they are actually making a judgment. But this argument is frequently lost on them, and I dare say, if you try to give it to them, you'll get tossed back a whole bunch of other stuff from them. So that's the concept that they actually believe that they are special and different from all the other generations. Next needs excessive admiration. It's really shocking how millennials expect praise for normal responsibilities of adulthood. This is known by millennials as adulting, a term I never heard of before until this...

...generation came around. An adulting includes pain bills, signing up for medical insurance, signing up for car insurance and cooking basic meals. Instead of viewing this as a customary part of being adult, many of them expect admiration for these standard adulting practices. That's the needs excessive admiration. Next, sense of entitlement, since there is an attitude amongst millennials that the ultimate goal in life is to maintain a constant state of happiness. It is as if they believe that they deserve to be happy all the time and should not be made to do activities that don't bring happiness. Some tout the unhappiness of their parents as an example of what they don't want to be as they age. That's their sense of entitlement. Exploitive of others. While millennials are excellent at not taking advantage...

...of each other, they seem to have no difficulty in taking advantage of their parents. Some don't leave home until there are thirties, others need financial assistance long into adulthood, and still others expect their parents to bail them out of problems. It is almost as if only those in their generation to serve respect and not other generations. That's the exploitiveness of others. Lack of empathy. The inability to feel empathetic with others translates into relationships that lack true intimacy. This, in turn brings a limited desire from making or maintaining a long term commitment to a partner. Some millennials postpone marriage or partnering well past the Psychosocial Age, and the psycho social age is anywhere between eighteen to thirty. Is What we're looking for, and that's when you should find intimacy versus isolation,...

...which is Eric Ericson's eight stages of psycho social development. Next, envious of others. Hidden beneath the surface of many millennials is a jealousy of others success. Some even believe that they should have success without any effort or that success comes without struggle, time, persistence, sacrifice and even pain. Even the slightest amount of discomfort is likely to stall them. That's the enviousness of others. And last an arrogant attitude. Sadly, many millennials mock other generations and their subsequent decisions, believing that they could do a better job. This arrogance prevents them from learning from the mistakes of others, growing from their own errors and seeing innovative ways of doing things. So that's the arrogant attitude. Those are all the traits of narcissism and how they apply to the millennial generation. Now, not, not all millennials are going to fit this profile, but...

...when you add narcissism into the mix, this is how it frequently manifests. So this is what it winds up looking like. As with any generation, there is a learning curve. There was with mine, there was with the previous generations and hopefully they, like my generation, saw the error of our ways, corrected it and we're able to make a more positive impact going forward. My hope and doing this is not to call them out in a negative way, but rather to call them out and encourage them to say, Hey, this is not what we want to be known for and this is not how we want to be viewed and do something different, because we do all have the ability to be different and better. Thanks for listening to understanding today's narcissist with Christine Hammond, brought to you in part by Psych Centralcom. For more information, visit grow with Christine dotcom.

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